The Beer Thread

Restaurants, food, beverage, hawkers, and local markets and suppliers. This is the place for discussion on Hua Hin's culinary options.
SPONSORS: Hua Hin Ham & Bacon : The Palm Bistro
Post Reply
User avatar
STEVE G
Hero
Hero
Posts: 11698
Joined: Mon Apr 03, 2006 3:50 am
Location: HUA HIN/EUROPE

Re: The Beer Thread

Post by STEVE G » Fri Jun 02, 2017 12:50 pm

fach3003 wrote:
Fri Jun 02, 2017 9:12 am
I've had U Beer a few times...i think it's ok...
The trendy logo and being the same ish price as Leo/Chang i recon will make it a hit
with the young thais....if it was priced like Archers they'd probably not buy it...
MInd i drink anything...hahaha...miss the old chang classic though...
and all the other Changs / export / daught etc : )))
U beer is from the same brewery that makes Singha and Leo and like you say, is basically a marketing tool aimed at the younger generation. Some reviews liken it to the old Singha Light which I found a bit light on taste but I'll try a case when I'm back in a couple of weeks.

binlid
Rookie
Rookie
Posts: 23
Joined: Wed Jun 21, 2017 9:35 am

Re: The Beer Thread

Post by binlid » Wed Jun 21, 2017 9:43 am

Tried U beer last time i was in town, the colder it is, the better it tastes!
Anybody suggest somewhere other than BluPort to get some craft beers?

handdrummer
Guru
Guru
Posts: 507
Joined: Mon Mar 03, 2014 11:58 am

Re: The Beer Thread

Post by handdrummer » Thu Jun 22, 2017 6:21 am

I tried beer lao the other day. the dark was bitter with not much body and the lager was ok but a little sweet for my taste. is it really necessary to put sugar in beer?

hhinner
Ace
Ace
Posts: 1223
Joined: Fri Nov 09, 2012 2:17 pm

Re: The Beer Thread

Post by hhinner » Thu Jun 22, 2017 11:50 am

^^ Yes.

hhinner
Ace
Ace
Posts: 1223
Joined: Fri Nov 09, 2012 2:17 pm

Re: The Beer Thread

Post by hhinner » Thu Jun 22, 2017 11:55 am

^^ Actually sugar isn't necessary as the required sugars for fermentation can be got from malted barley. But using sugar produces lighter flavoured beers, I think.

User avatar
J.J.B.
Guru
Guru
Posts: 771
Joined: Sun Jul 22, 2012 10:03 pm

Re: The Beer Thread

Post by J.J.B. » Thu Jun 22, 2017 1:41 pm

handdrummer wrote:
Thu Jun 22, 2017 6:21 am
I tried beer lao the other day. the dark was bitter with not much body and the lager was ok but a little sweet for my taste. is it really necessary to put sugar in beer?
Absolutely not. In simple, brewing terms, sugars are what yeasts feed on to produce alcohol, the process commonly known as fermentation. There are simple and complex sugars and the type we put in tea and coffee (sucrose), that tastes sweet to us, would not play a part in professional brewing. All of the sugar in brewing should come from "mashing" the malted barley in warm "liquor" (water by any other name) to create a sweet "wort". Frequently, small quantities of other grains (torrified wheat etc.) are added to impart other flavours or properties, such as "head retention" in the finished product.

Colour is provided by the length of time the malted barley is roasted for; the longer, the darker. So light coloured beers are generally made from pale and crystal malts whereas porters and stouts contain large quantities of chocolate and black malts. There are very complex calculations that are performed to workout how many yeast cells are needed to ferment a certain volume of wort to produce the desired amount of alcohol. A sweet tasting beer could result from a partial or "stuck" fermentation where not enough yeast was used for the amount of wort but likely because that is the style the brewer was aiming for.

A professional brewer will generally alter the alcohol content of their beer by increasing the malt to liquor ratio, producing a wort with a higher sugar content. They may also select a yeast that can thrive in a high alcohol environment and perhaps ferment their wort two or three times with fresh yeast each time. A home brewer will probably add some brewing sugar (dextrose) or dry malt extract to their wort to increase the sugar content and so raise the alcohol content, but it's an imprecise science if you don't pay attention to the yeast strain you use and how you prepare the culture.

Also, a home brewer will frequently use the "secondary fermentation" process to carbonate their beer in the bottle, since initially fermented beer is not "fizzy". This is most simply done by adding some sugar (sometimes sucrose) to the bottle before sealing the cap. Residual yeast cells from the primary fermentation will be reactivated by the new food source and, in this case, carbon dioxide is the main by-product. This dissolves in the beer, because the bottle is a fixed volume container, and carbonates the beer. Again, too much sugar or too little yeast will likely produce a sweet-tasting beer. And this is just sugar.
[edit: professional brewers pump carbon dioxide into beer in a "brite tank" to carbonate the beer, so no new sugar is added in a secondary fermentation process]
There's also the hops and water chemistry and fining and temperature and conditioning and...and..!

It's possible that some "professional" brewers may use some very "home brewing" methods.

:cheers:
"A man who does not think for himself, does not think at all."
Wilde

handdrummer
Guru
Guru
Posts: 507
Joined: Mon Mar 03, 2014 11:58 am

Re: The Beer Thread

Post by handdrummer » Thu Jun 22, 2017 2:09 pm

well, that was certainly an education! thank you, I hadn't any idea of all that.

oakdale160
Legend
Legend
Posts: 2730
Joined: Sat Jul 06, 2013 9:51 pm

Re: The Beer Thread

Post by oakdale160 » Fri Jun 23, 2017 12:29 am

You seem to imply that all beers have some roasted barley in the mix. I thought that only Stouts (or porters) used roasted barley. Other critical differences are the Temp at which the process is conducted and whether top or bottom fermenting yeasts are used-- these differences cause the division into Ales and Lagers.

User avatar
J.J.B.
Guru
Guru
Posts: 771
Joined: Sun Jul 22, 2012 10:03 pm

Re: The Beer Thread

Post by J.J.B. » Fri Jun 23, 2017 1:44 pm

^^
If that's the implication then I should clarify that the process of malting grains involves kiln-drying them shortly after germination has started. How high a termperature and how long they spend in the kiln is the major contributor to the colour they impart to their respective beers. You can malt other grains, such as oats, rye and wheat, but these malts are almost always added to an already substantial bill of barley malts. Even Pilsner, Vienna and Munich malts - the base for most lagers - are kiln dried but at a low temperature so as to maintain a pale colour.

As for temperature, yeast variety and the like. Absolutely, this is not just critical in the fermentation stage but in the mashing stage beforehand, the length of the boil, as well as conditioning. I've made a number of all grain ale-style beers now and haven't contemplated a lager yet because of the significant amount of time it would need to be in my fermentation fridge. While an ale can complete primary fermentation within a week to 10 days at around 20°C, lagers require at least twice that at only 12°C and then a longer conditioning period in secondary (the process known as 'lagering') at around 1°C, to be fully ready.

I found this useful "beer map" to show different beer styles and where they fit on the bitter/sweet and fruity/malty scale. I'm still not sure where Lao sits! :D

IMG_0057.JPG
IMG_0057.JPG (52.64 KiB) Viewed 309 times
"A man who does not think for himself, does not think at all."
Wilde

Pleng
Legend
Legend
Posts: 2584
Joined: Fri Apr 08, 2011 2:04 am
Location: Hua Hin

Re: The Beer Thread

Post by Pleng » Fri Jul 14, 2017 5:07 pm

Not sure if it's been mentioned here before or not, but the Supermarket on the PoliceStationMcBurgerKingOppositeTheRoadLeadingToTheHilton stretch has 330ml cans of Fosters larger at 35bt per can. Imported from Vietnam

User avatar
prcscct
Golden Chili
Golden Chili
Posts: 20162
Joined: Tue Mar 23, 2004 7:58 am
Location: All Blacks training camp

Re: The Beer Thread

Post by prcscct » Fri Jul 14, 2017 5:14 pm

^ I wonder how it compares to the Australian made brew? We have a problem with the Thai Heineken vs the Dutch original as we've discussed on here several times. It's been so long though since I've had a Fosters of any origin I probably wouldn't know anymore. :( Pete :cheers:
Governments are instituted among Men, deriving their just powers from the consent of the governed. Source

User avatar
404cameljockey
Professional
Professional
Posts: 262
Joined: Sat Apr 30, 2016 5:14 am

Re: The Beer Thread

Post by 404cameljockey » Fri Jul 14, 2017 5:38 pm

I am a fan of dark Beer Lao, also I love the strengths of a lot of beers here! Fullers ESB or Youngs London Ale are still primo for me as far as taste goes but at 150 Baht for half a litre they're not my go to. I may be a philistine, but I like Chang a lot, maybe a Tsingtao like taste?

I'm trying Red Horse for the first time now, but I have a bad attack of evening hay fever, not getting much from it, even tastes a bit home-brewy. Must be my pallate. Says from San Miguel Beer (Thailand) Ltd. Anyone tried it? Cheap.
Image

User avatar
404cameljockey
Professional
Professional
Posts: 262
Joined: Sat Apr 30, 2016 5:14 am

Re: The Beer Thread

Post by 404cameljockey » Fri Jul 14, 2017 6:16 pm

J.J.B. wrote:
Fri Jun 23, 2017 1:44 pm

I found this useful "beer map" to show different beer styles and where they fit on the bitter/sweet and fruity/malty scale. I'm still not sure where Lao sits! :D


IMG_0057.JPG
Pre-Prohibition American Lager??? Is that a thing?

RCer
Guru
Guru
Posts: 616
Joined: Sun Apr 03, 2016 12:48 pm

Re: The Beer Thread

Post by RCer » Fri Jul 14, 2017 8:12 pm

On the rare occassion I drank beer before coming here, it was Dos Equis Amber. Its an amber lager.

Is there a comparable beer here? I tried Singha and don't like it.

User avatar
404cameljockey
Professional
Professional
Posts: 262
Joined: Sat Apr 30, 2016 5:14 am

Re: The Beer Thread

Post by 404cameljockey » Sat Jul 15, 2017 10:57 am

RCer wrote:
Fri Jul 14, 2017 8:12 pm
On the rare occassion I drank beer before coming here, it was Dos Equis Amber. Its an amber lager.

Is there a comparable beer here? I tried Singha and don't like it.
I haven't found a local equivalent to the great Dos Equis (I love the dark, but the light is tasty too I agree) , you'd have to look at the imported beers I think.

Post Reply

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Bing [Bot], RCer and 22 guests