Drones/Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV)

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Nereus
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Re: Drones/Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV)

Post by Nereus » Sat Jan 20, 2018 9:36 am

Drone rescue a world first

http://www.flightsafetyaustralia.com/20 ... rld-first/

A drone rescued two swimmers from a NSW beach yesterday in a mission believed to be the first of its type.

Lifeguards from Surf Life Saving NSW were at Lennox Head, on the state’s north coast, preparing for a drone training session about 11.30am yesterday when a call came through of two distressed swimmers in a three-metre swell.

The drone pilot was able to locate the swimmers within minutes of the initial alert. He dropped a rescue pod containing an automatically inflating flotation device to the swimmers, who were able to cling to it. They made their own way to shore where they were met by lifeguards. A camera in the drone filmed the rescue.

The Westpac Little Ripper Lifesaver drone was a modified DJI M600 electric six-rotor type with a maximum take-off weight of 15 kg, including a 7 kg payload, a top speed of 34 kt (64 km/h) and a take-off wind limit of 20 kt.

The M600 Pro is listed at $A7899 on the DJI website. The rescue pod it dropped also contained an electromagnetic shark repellent, whistle, and sea anchor.

Westpac Little Ripper chief executive Eddie Bennet said the rescue followed three years of intensive development.
‘(It) clearly illustrates the benefit of this cutting-edge technology in such a time-critical emergency situation. It works and Australia is leading the world in this technology’, Mr Bennet said.
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Re: Drones/Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV)

Post by Nereus » Mon May 07, 2018 11:28 am

A billion aircraft: the future of drones

http://www.flightsafetyaustralia.com/20 ... of-drones/

If US futurist Thomas Frey is right, in only 12 years drones will be as ubiquitous as cars. Frey says there will be 1 billion drones in use around the world by 2030. What exotic new roles will these combinations of computing, robotics and aerodynamics play in society? Here are a few exciting new ways drones are currently redefining aviation and its purpose.

Drones that follow your face

Facial recognition software is set to become a standard feature for drones. Chinese mass-market drone maker DJI has features such as Follow-Me, where the user can identify a target or object on the screen of the App being used to control the drone. Once locked in, the drone will track a target. As it moves, the drone will keep constant its distance and height in relation to the object, with its camera pointed in the correct direction and recording the whole time.

Drones with people in them

Flying taxis could soon be coming to a sky near you. Multiple companies from different countries are developing their versions of flying cars or ‘taxi drones’ based on multi-rotor aerial platforms. Most adopt the X-8 configuration, consisting of eight rotors mounted on four arms. Each arm has two engines placed directly upside down from under each other in various clockwise and anti-clockwise configurations that cancel out the need for the tail-rotor used by traditional helicopters. This design is used by many heavy lift drones currently in service commercially for payloads exceeding 10 kg. Take that platform, scale up the size, add a passenger cell, and you have a flying taxi.

Drones in the stratosphere

Facebook’s Mark Zuckerberg has his own future drone concept in production. Aquila, a solar powered flying wing, successfully completed its first test flight on June 28, 2017. Flying for more than 90 minutes, it stayed aloft for more than three times longer than was originally planned.

Drones over construction sites

Skycatch, a Californian company, is one of the future tech start-ups using AI and drones for a new purpose. They are building drones that use machine learning to map construction sites, plan out the work, and guide autonomous construction vehicles around the site.

Popular drone uses we all know and love

Perhaps you marvelled recently at the opening ceremony for the Winter Olympics in South Korea when 1200 illuminated drones flew in a swarm, creating beautiful moving shapes and images against the night sky. Or perhaps you were nonplussed. But entertainment is just one of the possible uses for swarms of drones. If one drone is useful, how useful would ten or 100 be?

Drone delivery

Drones may even replace the motor scooter, electric bicycle, or most commonly, a worn out small hatchback, as the vehicle of choice for delivering fast food. Trials are underway around the world, including in the southern suburbs of Canberra, to see if it is possible, economical, and most importantly, acceptably safe to deliver small packages over short distances in this way.
May you be in heaven half an hour before the devil know`s you`re dead!

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