How can Thailand curb its appalling road fatality rate?

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Nereus
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Re: How can Thailand curb its appalling road fatality rate?

Post by Nereus » Sat Dec 16, 2017 3:31 pm

Not sure that all of the traffic police will be able to follow this: :twisted:
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New form of traffic tickets due Sunday

https://www.bangkokpost.com/news/genera ... recent_box

Traffic police will start using a new form of tickets nationwide on Sunday.

The change is part of the Police Ticket Management project (PTM), said Pol Maj Gen Ekkarak Limsangkat, commander of the 3rd Special Branch Bureau who leads the project. 

The new ticket will have a barcode and checkboxes for traffic violations in Thai and English (picture below). Up until Sunday, the offences were written down on tickets by issuing police. 

Motorists are required to pay the fines within seven days after receiving them.

They can either pay in cash immediately at police stations or wait two days for the tickets to be registered into the system before paying the fines at the branches, ATMs and KTB NetBank mobile app of Krungthai Bank or other spots where the PTM logo is displayed. A bank fee of 20 baht per ticket applies in this case.

However, if a driver’s licence has been seized when the ticket is issued, payments at the state bank is not possible.
Policemen have also been instructed to tell motorists everytime they issue tickets that they are a new form and inform motorists how to pay the fines.

In the future, the police's ticket database will be linked with that of the Land Transport Department so that the latter can temporarily suspend the annual vehicle tax payment for those who fail to pay the fines. 

copy of form shown at the link ..............................................
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Re: How can Thailand curb its appalling road fatality rate?

Post by hhinner » Sun Dec 17, 2017 11:57 am

At least foreigners will be able to see what the actual offence is instead of being told one thing by the cop but his illegible scrawl saying something else.

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Re: How can Thailand curb its appalling road fatality rate?

Post by buksida » Sun Dec 17, 2017 12:54 pm

hhinner wrote:
Sun Dec 17, 2017 11:57 am
At least foreigners will be able to see what the actual offence is instead of being told one thing by the cop but his illegible scrawl saying something else.
Yep, whatever offence they decide to invent today.
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Re: How can Thailand curb its appalling road fatality rate?

Post by oakdale160 » Mon Dec 18, 2017 2:30 am

Your offence is that you are a farang, are here in Thailand and you are driving or riding on Thai roads.

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Re: How can Thailand curb its appalling road fatality rate?

Post by StevePIraq » Mon Dec 18, 2017 3:17 pm

it is a good thing, at least a tiny step in the right direction.
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Re: How can Thailand curb its appalling road fatality rate?

Post by PeteC » Wed Dec 20, 2017 8:05 pm

The "pee" style of this is going to spook a lot of Thais. Let's hope it spooks them enough to make a difference.

"A new YouTube video campaigning against drink-driving during the Christmas and New Year period highlights the fact that Thailand has the highest rate of road-accident fatalities in the world outside of a war zone.

Prominent businessman Sermsin Samalapa on Wednesday uploaded the 55-second “Drink Drive Death” clip, of which he was executive producer, with the intention of raising awareness among the public about the danger of driving while drunk".......

http://www.nationmultimedia.com/detail/ ... l/30334396



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Re: How can Thailand curb its appalling road fatality rate?

Post by Nereus » Thu Dec 21, 2017 4:43 pm

E-tickets take hold, but penalty points on ice

https://www.bangkokpost.com/news/genera ... nts-on-ice

E-tickets have been rolled out for motorists, who in line with the technology-driven Thailand 4.0 era, can now pay their traffic fines at bank ATMs.

However, the demerit-based points penalty system -- another sweeping change which the Department of Land Transport (DLT) hopes to introduce -- will have to wait, despite the fact that e-ticketing would be a natural fit with the technology which will underpin it. After many delays, police and the DLT say it will now come into effect in April next year.

E-tickets equipped with barcodes, which came into effect on Dec 17, let motorists pay fines for minor offences at Krungthai Bank ATMs with barcode readers on them, as well as the bank's mobile app. Traffic authorities hope the E-tickets will also key a key driver of the much-heralded demerit-points based penalty system, introduced overseas and widely discussed in the industry for a couple of decades.

However, that impetus is still some way off as the department has yet to buy the software which will underpin it, and in fact is still making key decisions about how to implement it. This includes how many points motorists should be assigned, and how many should be deducted for various offences.

In the initial period, e-tickets are being issued in the jurisdictions of the Metropolitan Police Bureau (MPB) and Provincial Police Region 1, 2 and 7, in charge of the Central Plains, East and the western Central Plains respectively, police deputy spokesman Krissana Pattanacharoen said. During this period, tickets will be issued for traffic offences in which officers do not seize offenders' licences, such as parking vehicles in no-parking zones or places that obstruct traffic.

If officers decide to temporarily seize driving licences and issue tickets, offenders still need to pay the fines at police stations or designated areas within seven days, in line with the Land Traffic Act, Pol Col Krissana said. This is because DLT staff still cannot gain access to Royal Thai Police (RTF) digital database to get information on traffic violators.

Kamol Buranaphong, DLT deputy director-general, said digital processing of all penalties including licence suspensions, which will eventually take place under the penalty point system, will have to wait for now.

Local authorities have been hoping to use the demerit point system for decades. Widely used in many countries such as Britain, Japan and Singapore, drivers are given a score which is deducted when they violate traffic laws. Drivers who are given many traffic tickets might lose so many points their licences are suspended or even revoked.

Mr Kamol said the department is in the process of buying the software enabling the DLT to gain access to the police database, and it should be in place by September next year. "After our software is ready, we can begin talks with the RTP about the penalties for traffic violators to be enforced under this system," he said.

RTP deputy commissioner-general Chiraphat Bhumichitr said police are examining the legal details. "Although we are going to use a point-based deduction system for violators, the RTP's legal division is still discussing the starting amount of points to be given to each licence holder," he said.

They are also discussing the appropriate time frame for licence suspensions such as 60 days for a first suspension and 90 days for a second suspension. Pol Maj Gen Chiraphat said drafting regulations for the demerit point system would take time because it will be used nationwide. "Once these rules are enforced, penalties will be harsher, especially for those who are caught driving without licences," he said.
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Re: How can Thailand curb its appalling road fatality rate?

Post by StevePIraq » Fri Dec 22, 2017 10:53 am

So basically they are not going to do anything until at least September 2018 when they will begin talks. By 2018 it will all be in the waste bin and it will be carry on as normal.
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Re: How can Thailand curb its appalling road fatality rate?

Post by buksida » Tue Jan 09, 2018 3:47 pm

New campaign to attract passengers to wear helmets while riding on motorcycle taxis
The Royal Thai Police has now come up with a new idea to encourage passengers to wear helmets while riding on motorcycle taxis.

The police with the cooperation from Chulalongkorn University and the private sector have the idea after noticing many passengers riding on motorcycle taxis carrying the helmets on their laps or just hanging around, refusing to wear them.

They found out later that it was a matter of health concern in sharing helmets. A large number of passengers refuse to wear them because the helmets were unclean and smelling.

Owing to this fact, the Royal Thai Police has joined Chulalongkorn University, and Prime Nano Technology Co Ltd to launch a campaign to encourage passengers to wear helmets for interest of their own safety in riding motorcycle taxis in the city.

Silver nano technology will be applied to disinfect and eliminate musty smell from the helmets now motorcycle taxis give their passengers to wear as forced by the law, but always refused because of the uncomfortable body odour from the helmets.

Under the campaign called “Clean helmet, No smelling, and Riding safe,” service stations will be erected at main commercial and business areas, such as at Chulalongkorn, Siam Square and Chalermpao intersection to spray helmets with silver nano to eliminate the smell free of charge.

But in the initial stage, 300 helmets coated with silver nano sprays will be distributed freely to motorcycle taxis at Siam Square and Chulalongkorn for use by their passengers.

Royal Thai Police Deputy Commissioner Pol Gen Wirachai Songmetta said 77.83% of fatal traffic accidents during the 7 dangerous days were motorcycle accidents.

Most fatalities were resulted from not wearing helmets, he said.

He said wearing helmets could save lives of up to 37%, while those refusing to wear have risk of death and injuries six times higher than those who wear them.

With the campaign of clean helmet, it was hopefully that passengers would turn to wearing more helmets when they become more friendly to health.

http://englishnews.thaipbs.or.th/new-ca ... cle-taxis/
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Re: How can Thailand curb its appalling road fatality rate?

Post by HHTel » Tue Jan 09, 2018 4:57 pm

You see quite regularly, motorcyclists who don their helmets (unsecured) while passing a police checkpoint, only to remove them, on the move, and return them to the basket when clear of the checkpoint.

What's their excuse?

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Re: How can Thailand curb its appalling road fatality rate?

Post by Big Boy » Tue Jan 09, 2018 5:49 pm

Who is going to encourage the Royal Thai Police to wear helmets? Daily it is possible to see officers riding their motorcycles wearing police baseball caps.
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Re: How can Thailand curb its appalling road fatality rate?

Post by HHTel » Tue Jan 09, 2018 8:26 pm

I agree BB. Turned up soi 58 this afternoon which is one way. I had to pull over to allow a police bike with two up going the wrong way. What chance is there for the general public to adhere to traffic laws when the 'enforcers' flout the laws themselves.

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Re: How can Thailand curb its appalling road fatality rate?

Post by handdrummer » Wed Jan 10, 2018 1:08 am

If you're a regular motorbike passenger buy your own helmet.

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Re: How can Thailand curb its appalling road fatality rate?

Post by oakdale160 » Wed Jan 10, 2018 2:33 am

The purpose of helmets is to protect the brain. With MIB there's not much to protect.

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Re: How can Thailand curb its appalling road fatality rate?

Post by lomuamart » Thu Jan 11, 2018 1:34 pm

This morning, I noticed that there was a new traffic sign that stretched over the southbound carriageway of Petchkasem Road, just south of Soi 19, by the temple.
Not only did it spell out the speed limit but there were illustrations of speed cameras on it as well (heaven knows if there are any of those).
But one other feature was that there must have been speed sensors above each lane. They flashed up your speed and if excessive told you to slow down.
Whether anyone takes any notice of this is a moot point but I thought it a decent addition to things and was the first time I've ever noticed one of these speed sensitive signs in HH (mind you, I'm not a driver).

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