Retirement visas for British married couple

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killala
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Retirement visas for British married couple

Post by killala » Sun Feb 07, 2016 5:20 pm

Hi. New to this forum and need advice from someone that's actually been there done it and still wearing the T shirt.
We are seriously considering retirement in HH this year. We would purchase property rather than rent as we see rental as dead money but so confused as to the vicissitudes of retirement visa. We have the wherewithal to satisfy the financial requirements in our case 800k baht for myself and my wife has pensions of c55k baht per month so her application would need a few grand plus the pension as we see it. However, we read that only the male partner can be considered as the main visa holder regarding pension plus cash and as i'm only 60 and not yet in receipt of my pensions that can't be.
Anyone in Forumland in a similar situation and could advise, we should be most grateful.
On a slightly different note, we should have around 55k baht per month to live on without touching capital.
Taking into consideration that we wont be paying rent but just the necessities of car, normal household bills plus broadband and sat or cable tv etc is that figure realistic?
Thanks for reading.

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Re: Retirement visas for British married couple

Post by Dannie Boy » Sun Feb 07, 2016 6:03 pm

Welcome to the Forum. I'm sure our resident expert on Visas Lomumart will put you(and me) right, but I'm fairly certain that you will qualify for an OA visa (commonly referred to as a retirement visa) as you're over 50 and will have the 800k baht, and your wife will qualify as your dependent. If you have the 800k as a lump sum, then you don't have to show that you have a regular pension, it's one or the other, although if you go down the pension route, the minimum requirement is 65,000 a month.

If you have the funds to buy a property and car, then you can live on 55,000 a month without too much difficulty - you may not live like roalty, but neither will you be paupers - assuming you have reasonable living expectations and don't play golf at all, or just infrequently.

Most people recommend renting a house initially while you search for your ideal property, making sure it's in the right area and doesn't have any hidden surprises.

I'm sure you'll get lots of further advice, hopefully helping you to make the right decisions.

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Re: Retirement visas for British married couple

Post by Big Boy » Sun Feb 07, 2016 6:36 pm

killala wrote:We would purchase property rather than rent as we see rental as dead money
I'm sure you've researched this already, but you have to be aware that you can't own the land, so you would be restricted to living in a block of flats or on land that is only rented.
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killala
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Re: Retirement visas for British married couple

Post by killala » Sun Feb 07, 2016 7:26 pm

Thanks a million to both respondents so far. So what you're saying Dannie Boy is that only myself would have to obtain the visa and herself would qualify as my dependent? Cool! Ah, no, I wouldn't know one end of a golf club from the other and nor would I want to frankly. Far too slow!
And yep, we do aim to rent for a month or two. We do know the parish very well as we've been visiting since 2007 and have a fair idea as to where we would like to be and thanks Big Boy we do know the script regarding land purchase. Would seem leasehold would be more popular today than Chanote but we will listen to all advice and be grateful for it, on any relevant topic that may ease our passage so to speak...

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Re: Retirement visas for British married couple

Post by eatuae » Sun Feb 07, 2016 8:19 pm

Hi there kill all
Not quite true, you are ok on your visa but your wife will have to have a visa too. Initially they accepted our marriage licences but the next year we needed an embassy stamp on it. The British Embassy in Bangkok don't stamp documents so had to send off to uk for a Foreign and Commonwealth apostille copy marriage certificate ok BUT. Now say we need a Thai translation with a Thai Embassy stamp and British stamp which we have don and hopefully on Wednesday this will be ok. I would contact Thai Embassy in uk to sort out your wife's documents before you arrive here.
It has been hard work but hope we are sorted after 4 years of of changing rules but this is Thailand

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Re: Retirement visas for British married couple

Post by killala » Sun Feb 07, 2016 8:47 pm

Thanks for that little gem. Beginning to wonder if it's at all worth it. Thai's have always had a way of keeping foreigners out and they show no sign of letting up at all. Some people seem to welcome foreign investment yet others...

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Re: Retirement visas for British married couple

Post by kendo » Sun Feb 07, 2016 9:47 pm

Don't forget to factor in medical insurance.
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Re: Retirement visas for British married couple

Post by killala » Sun Feb 07, 2016 10:55 pm

That's a separate issue Kendo thanks. I have a few ailments, shall we say, which would be pre-existing and as such wouldn't be covered so unsure as to whether to take out insurance or to cover our medical costs privately. Depending on premium costs I guess for a couple in their 60s and what I could get cover for?

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Re: Retirement visas for British married couple

Post by Don East Stand » Mon Feb 08, 2016 11:58 am

Hi Killala,

Welcome to the forum!

My wife and I are both British, legally married, and both over 50, but under UK retirement age. We have been staying here for 8 years on the Non Immigrant "O" visas (retirement)

Your wife will require a visa BUT she will not have to show savings or income provided YOU satisfy the financial requirements i.e. the 800,000 THB savings OR 65,000 THB per month income.

I always find the Immigration officials here in Hua Hin to be helpful and there is very little to worry about regarding obtaining extensions to the Non - Immigrant "O" visas (retirement) provided you satisfy the basic requirements.

It sounds like eatuae may have a Thai wife which might complicate things for him, but you should be OK.

If I can clarify anything else, I'll try to help ..... and 55k a month is plenty to live on.

:cheers: :cheers: :cheers:

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Re: Retirement visas for British married couple

Post by eatuae » Mon Feb 08, 2016 3:11 pm

It always amazes me what utter cr** some people post on here
Where as I may like to have a Thai wife my Yorkshire born and bred wife my have something to say about that with a large carving knife in hand
The facts I have stated are true as I make the annual trip to HH and each year receive my retirement visa on a private pension and my wife's on a marriage visa with the conditions I have already stated
There may be other ways of doing this but this way means no visa runs and multiple entry
Please do not disputed the accuracy of the information I have given the visas in our passport validity my information

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Re: Retirement visas for British married couple

Post by killala » Mon Feb 08, 2016 4:38 pm

Good morning people. Thanks for all posts and please keep them coming as we really do need input from people on the ground,so to speak, as we would make an informed decision rather than pot luck.
This certified marriage certificate is just one in a growing list of things that makes us think that the hassle may not be worth the effort. We are looking for a relaxing retirement without obstacles but here's the thing, we love Thailand! It would be far simpler to head down to Malaysia as they actually welcome foreign investment and make the whole immigration process very simple indeed but housing is very expensive and the housing stock is in general town houses or apartments and they're not for us.

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Re: Retirement visas for British married couple

Post by JamesWest » Mon Feb 08, 2016 8:01 pm

Hello Killala,
Welcome to the forum.

you know, i think people on this forum and other Thailand forums sometimes miss the concept that there is no universal "you" on a internet forum.

Everybody please keep that in mind when answering questions as everyone is different and having different experiences doing exactly the same things in Thailand.

How much money to live is a great example. While there is a general belief that maybe you need round 60,00 baht a month to "live" here, I get by on 45,000 baht, while others would chime in and say "Impossible! You need 100,000 baht a month."

Infomation is different especially if they are relaying their experience from a year ago or even six months ago, a different imigration office in a different part of Thailand, if they themselves are pleasant or rude people, dressed or act in way that disrespects Thai culture, made a Thai immigration officer lose face on their mistake or misunderstanding , unprepared, don't speak much English, come from different countries with different Embassies, have more complex financal statements, single, married, children, got unlucky and got a grumpy immigration person, and a million of factors that affect your experience here.

Thailand is in a constant state of flux, to say the least.

My first experience at Hua Hin immigration for my "retirement extension of stay" when great, the female immigration officer as flirting with me, and said "you do all 90 day reporting directly to me" with a big smile and she give me her card.

The next years extention experience was really difficult as after the coup the immigration office changed, I got the bi*ch from hell who would not even look at me, treated me like dirt for no reason and started the process looking for problems. I had to go back to the bank to have every page on my bank statements stamped, not just the main letter, and a bunch of other stuff I did not need to do the first year. In the end, it was nothing to get to crazy about, the point is it was just totally different.

There was one Farang man who was in a rage at immigration, and in loud voice was attacking the Thais and disrespecting their country. Brilliant. As if the Thais at immigration don't understand everything he was saying. I am sure if he was posting here, we would get very negative input.

so everybody's input is valid, if not sometime contradictory.
I really like this forum because there are no personal attacks. All the members contribute in a positive way to my posts.

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Re: Retirement visas for British married couple

Post by JamesWest » Mon Feb 08, 2016 8:41 pm

killala wrote:Thanks for that little gem. Beginning to wonder if it's at all worth it. Thai's have always had a way of keeping foreigners out and they show no sign of letting up at all. Some people seem to welcome foreign investment yet others...
one way to think of it is you are granted permission to stay one year at a time with a retirement extension of stay. this goes on forever until you die.

drop below the financial requirements say maybe ten years from now for unforeseen circumstances,(your health or exchange rate could be one, just ask the Russians) and out you go.

so you are investing in a country where your right to stay long term is not assured.

Overall, don't be discouraged. It is really not so bad at immigration, you just have to do your homewoork, get the most current information for your circumstances, be prepared with all your docs, expect there to be some snags, and once you get in, all you have to do is report every 90 days and renew every year. I think of it like one days work plus three 30 minute visits a year. not much really for me.

And so I don't go much more crazy, my rule is I always expect everything I try to do in Thailand with the government, utilities, and insurance to take three "tries" to get it done. :)
I really like this forum because there are no personal attacks. All the members contribute in a positive way to my posts.

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Re: Retirement visas for British married couple

Post by wpcoe » Mon Feb 08, 2016 8:45 pm

While it is legal, acceptable and economical for one spouse to obtain a retirement extension and the other spouse to then have a dependent spouse extension, if you are easily able to both qualify for independent visas/extensions, there is one (unpleasant) factor to consider: In the case of the dependent extension, if the other spouse (the one on a retirement extension) dies, the dependent has seven days to get things in order and depart the country. With all the trauma and stress of the death of a loved one, being required to leave the country might not be welcome added stress. If both spouses are on independent visas/extensions, the surviving spouse need not worry about leaving the country within seven days.

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Re: Retirement visas for British married couple

Post by JamesWest » Mon Feb 08, 2016 9:02 pm

killala wrote:That's a separate issue Kendo thanks. I have a few ailments, shall we say, which would be pre-existing and as such wouldn't be covered so unsure as to whether to take out insurance or to cover our medical costs privately. Depending on premium costs I guess for a couple in their 60s and what I could get cover for?
I am with Bupa Insurance, but I got coverage when I was 58, but I think they have a cut off at 60 if not already insured.

Anyway I am in excellent health with no preexisting conditions, don't smoke, and my payment for Platinum coverage is 89,000 baht a year, or about 60% less than what I was paying in the USA.

If you have no claims they refund 10% of the previous years premium.They can't raise rates until 65, so i can expect a hit there, and can't cancel you unless you don't pay.

Scooter and motorcyce accidents is 50% coverage limits. No STD's or AIDS treatment (this is Thailand after all) :) I have been told Bupa is expensive, so maybe someone else has a better company.

My insurance is for something catastrophic, like trying to cross the street. :)
I really like this forum because there are no personal attacks. All the members contribute in a positive way to my posts.

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