The Beer Thread

Restaurants, food, beverage, hawkers, and local markets and suppliers. This is the place for discussion on Hua Hin's culinary options.
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le_raconteur
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Re: The Beer Thread

Post by le_raconteur » Mon Oct 01, 2018 1:38 am

HHTel wrote:
Sun Sep 30, 2018 2:43 pm
Actually craft/micro breweries are banned in Thailand. The Liquors Act passed in 1950 outlawed Thai people from brewing and selling beer which means Thais are liable to a B200 fine for brewing beer and a B5000 fine and 6 months in jail for selling it.
You're absolutely correct in the above law. However, in recent years there have been craft beer exhibitions, openly advertised. I've not heard of anyone being taken to task using this law.

I think it's enforced the same as 3 on a bike and will at some point be repealed.
There have been some prosecutions and resistance to the law is growing. The owner of Chit Beer has been openly flouting the law and paid the fines on a couple of occasions, I think.

I think the law states that a brewery must brew more than 10,000kl a year and hold over 10 million baht in capital. Independant shops selling homemade beer must produce at least 100kl a year.

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Re: The Beer Thread

Post by le_raconteur » Mon Oct 01, 2018 1:55 am

STEVE G wrote:
Sun Sep 30, 2018 10:26 pm
buksida wrote:
Sun Sep 30, 2018 11:36 am
Chemical or not, Thai beer gives you a hangover unlike anything you'd get in the west so there must be some nasty shit in it. Additionally it is stored in boxes in the tropical heat for months so what stops it 'going off' if not chemical preservatives?
Alcohol is what stops it going 'off', that's why Chang used to be 6.4% and there are plenty of strong beers on the Continent that will give you hangovers to compare with Thai beers, I've drank most of them over the years and suffered accordingly!
Yes, beer doesn't really "go off". It does degrade though and in different ways. Higher alcohol beers will keep better for longer and can even improve with age. Imperial stouts and vintage beers - Fullers Vintage is a good example. Fullers recommend cellaring it for up to 10 years.

Beer usually degrades with age with the hops dropping off first. Of course, the hoppier the beer is the more it will degrade. Very hoppy American IPA's and Imperial IPA's are noticeably less enjoyable when they get older. Anything after 3 months after canning/bottling.

Beer can also be infected with bacteria and this can happen at different stages of the brewing process as well as canning/bottling and even on a draught system. Again the beer won't be "off" but could produce a number of distinct off flavours or could be sour.

Beer can also oxidise, caused by he oxidation of unsaturated fatty acids during malting and brewing. This will produce papery/wet cardboard flavours.

Skunking is another problem and probably the most common. It's caused by beer being light-struck. Some compounds in certain hops are photo-sensitive and will oxidise when light-struck. This produces the compound 3-methyl-2-butene-1-thiol (MBT). MBT is a very powerful flavour compound and produces the flavour associated with that of the malodorous spray skunks produce when defending themselves.

Anyone who's ever drunk a bottle of corona will have consumed a skunked beer. Beer in clear bottles will be skunked in about 3hrs in direct sunlight (green bottles about 3 days). This is the reason lime is dropped into corona as it neutralises the flavour - although it doesn't cure the problem. It's almost impossible to find a bottle of corona that isn't skunked.

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Re: The Beer Thread

Post by Pleng » Tue Oct 02, 2018 3:27 pm

caller wrote:
Sun Sep 30, 2018 12:49 pm
Brew houses aren't illegal in Thailand, as long as the product is only sold on the premises and not available for consumption elsewhere. There's such a place in Korat.
There's one here; the Hitlon nightclub

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Re: The Beer Thread

Post by Sabai Jai » Tue Oct 02, 2018 4:03 pm

I thought Hops (and alcohol content) help to keep a bottled beer? India Pale Ale was produced in England to ship to India and to "improve" rather than deteriorate during transport - shipping would have taken a while back the too...

India pale ale is a hoppy beer style within the broader category of pale ale. The term "pale ale" originally denoted an ale brewed from pale malt. Among the first brewers known to export beer to India was George Hodgson's Bow Brewery, on the Middlesex-Essex border. Bow Brewery beers became popular among East India Company traders in the late 18th century because of the brewery's location near the East India Docks. Demand for the export style of pale ale, which had become known as India pale ale, developed in England around 1840 and it later became a popular product there. IPAs have a long history in Canada and the United States, and many breweries there produce a version of the style.

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Re: The Beer Thread

Post by le_raconteur » Sat Oct 06, 2018 3:12 pm

Sabai Jai wrote:
Tue Oct 02, 2018 4:03 pm
I thought Hops (and alcohol content) help to keep a bottled beer? India Pale Ale was produced in England to ship to India and to "improve" rather than deteriorate during transport - shipping would have taken a while back the too...

India pale ale is a hoppy beer style within the broader category of pale ale. The term "pale ale" originally denoted an ale brewed from pale malt. Among the first brewers known to export beer to India was George Hodgson's Bow Brewery, on the Middlesex-Essex border. Bow Brewery beers became popular among East India Company traders in the late 18th century because of the brewery's location near the East India Docks. Demand for the export style of pale ale, which had become known as India pale ale, developed in England around 1840 and it later became a popular product there. IPAs have a long history in Canada and the United States, and many breweries there produce a version of the style.
Hops are a natural preservative, but do not improve flavour with age for the reasons I mentioned before. More hops were added to bitters being shipped to India to help preserve them but the hops would have deteriorated over time.

By the way, the text you copied and pasted can be found on many beer websites across the web and is a broad description given in layman's terms. The technicalities and vagaries of beer styles can be discussed in much greater depth. Non are a clearly defined or have any legal standing like wine classifications.

Here's a reference to the text quoted above.

https://www.beerjerk.co.nz/blogs/beer-s ... beer-style

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