Drones/Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV)

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Re: Drones/Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV)

Post by Nereus » Sat Jan 20, 2018 9:36 am

Drone rescue a world first

http://www.flightsafetyaustralia.com/20 ... rld-first/

A drone rescued two swimmers from a NSW beach yesterday in a mission believed to be the first of its type.

Lifeguards from Surf Life Saving NSW were at Lennox Head, on the state’s north coast, preparing for a drone training session about 11.30am yesterday when a call came through of two distressed swimmers in a three-metre swell.

The drone pilot was able to locate the swimmers within minutes of the initial alert. He dropped a rescue pod containing an automatically inflating flotation device to the swimmers, who were able to cling to it. They made their own way to shore where they were met by lifeguards. A camera in the drone filmed the rescue.

The Westpac Little Ripper Lifesaver drone was a modified DJI M600 electric six-rotor type with a maximum take-off weight of 15 kg, including a 7 kg payload, a top speed of 34 kt (64 km/h) and a take-off wind limit of 20 kt.

The M600 Pro is listed at $A7899 on the DJI website. The rescue pod it dropped also contained an electromagnetic shark repellent, whistle, and sea anchor.

Westpac Little Ripper chief executive Eddie Bennet said the rescue followed three years of intensive development.
‘(It) clearly illustrates the benefit of this cutting-edge technology in such a time-critical emergency situation. It works and Australia is leading the world in this technology’, Mr Bennet said.
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Re: Drones/Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV)

Post by Nereus » Mon May 07, 2018 11:28 am

A billion aircraft: the future of drones

http://www.flightsafetyaustralia.com/20 ... of-drones/

If US futurist Thomas Frey is right, in only 12 years drones will be as ubiquitous as cars. Frey says there will be 1 billion drones in use around the world by 2030. What exotic new roles will these combinations of computing, robotics and aerodynamics play in society? Here are a few exciting new ways drones are currently redefining aviation and its purpose.

Drones that follow your face

Facial recognition software is set to become a standard feature for drones. Chinese mass-market drone maker DJI has features such as Follow-Me, where the user can identify a target or object on the screen of the App being used to control the drone. Once locked in, the drone will track a target. As it moves, the drone will keep constant its distance and height in relation to the object, with its camera pointed in the correct direction and recording the whole time.

Drones with people in them

Flying taxis could soon be coming to a sky near you. Multiple companies from different countries are developing their versions of flying cars or ‘taxi drones’ based on multi-rotor aerial platforms. Most adopt the X-8 configuration, consisting of eight rotors mounted on four arms. Each arm has two engines placed directly upside down from under each other in various clockwise and anti-clockwise configurations that cancel out the need for the tail-rotor used by traditional helicopters. This design is used by many heavy lift drones currently in service commercially for payloads exceeding 10 kg. Take that platform, scale up the size, add a passenger cell, and you have a flying taxi.

Drones in the stratosphere

Facebook’s Mark Zuckerberg has his own future drone concept in production. Aquila, a solar powered flying wing, successfully completed its first test flight on June 28, 2017. Flying for more than 90 minutes, it stayed aloft for more than three times longer than was originally planned.

Drones over construction sites

Skycatch, a Californian company, is one of the future tech start-ups using AI and drones for a new purpose. They are building drones that use machine learning to map construction sites, plan out the work, and guide autonomous construction vehicles around the site.

Popular drone uses we all know and love

Perhaps you marvelled recently at the opening ceremony for the Winter Olympics in South Korea when 1200 illuminated drones flew in a swarm, creating beautiful moving shapes and images against the night sky. Or perhaps you were nonplussed. But entertainment is just one of the possible uses for swarms of drones. If one drone is useful, how useful would ten or 100 be?

Drone delivery

Drones may even replace the motor scooter, electric bicycle, or most commonly, a worn out small hatchback, as the vehicle of choice for delivering fast food. Trials are underway around the world, including in the southern suburbs of Canberra, to see if it is possible, economical, and most importantly, acceptably safe to deliver small packages over short distances in this way.
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Re: Drones/Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV)

Post by Nereus » Tue Aug 14, 2018 11:11 am

Drones on the range in wild bird round-up

http://www.flightsafetyaustralia.com/20 ... -round-up/

Engineers at Caltech, the California Institute of Technology, have developed software they say enables drones to herd birds, potentially reducing the risk of birdstrike near airports.

Principal investigator on the drone herding project, Soon-Jo Chung, said he had been inspired by thinking about the celebrated water landing of US Air flight 1549, in 2009, when pilots Chesley Sullenberger and Jeffrey Skiles were forced to land in the Hudson River after striking a flock of geese shortly after take-off.

‘The passengers on flight 1549 were only saved because the pilots were so skilled,’ Professor Chung said. ‘It made me think that next time might not have such a happy ending. So, I started looking into ways to protect airspace from birds by leveraging my research areas in autonomy and robotics.’

The study was co-written with Aditya Paranjape, Kyunam Kim, and David Hyunchul Shim. In it the engineers present a novel herding technique, called the m-waypoint herding algorithm. ‘The robotic UAV interacts with the flock by positioning itself sequentially at a periodically refreshed set of m points. It relies on the inherent stability of the flocking dynamics to prevent fragmentation of the flock, and the m points are chosen to maximise the deflection of the flock’s flight path,’ they say.

Professor Chung said herding was difficult with piloted drones. ‘When herding birds away from an airspace, you have to be very careful in how you position your drone. If it’s too far away, it won’t move the flock. And if it gets too close, you risk scattering the flock and making it completely uncontrollable.’

He told Caltech news ‘Herding relies on the ability to manage a flock as a single, contained entity—keeping it together while shifting its direction of travel. Each bird in a flock reacts to changes in the behavior of the birds nearest to it. Effective herding requires an external threat—in this case, the drone—to position itself in such a way that it encourages birds along the edge of a flock to make course changes that then affect the birds nearest to them, who affect birds farther into the flock, and so on, until the entire flock changes course. The positioning has to be precise, however: if the external threat gets too zealous and rushes at the flock, the birds will panic and act individually, not collectively.’

Professor Chung initially looked at developing flapping wing drones to herd birds, and even developed a ‘bat-bot’ but found the task could be done just as effectively by a conventional quadcopter drone.
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Re: Drones/Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV)

Post by Nereus » Fri Aug 24, 2018 1:34 pm

Drones offer help to ageing farmers


https://www.bangkokpost.com/tech/world- ... recent_box

TOME, Japan: The next generation farmhand in Japan's ageing rural heartland may be a drone.

For several months, developers and farmers in northeast Japan have been testing a new drone that can hover above paddy fields and perform backbreaking tasks in a fraction of the time it takes for elderly farmers.

"This is unprecedented high technology," said Isamu Sakakibara, a 69-year-old rice farmer in the Tome area, a region that has supplied rice to Tokyo since the 17th century.
Developers of the new agricultural drone say it offers high-tech relief for rural communities facing a shortage of labour as young people leave for the cities.

"As we face a shortage of next-generation farmers, it's our mission to come up with new ideas to raise productivity and farmers' income through the introduction of cutting-edge technologies such as drones," said Sakakibara, who is also the head of JA Miyagi Tome, the local agricultural cooperative.

The drone can apply pesticides and fertiliser to a rice field in about 15 minutes -- a job that takes more than an hour by hand and requires farmers to lug around heavy tanks.
The Nile-T18 was developed by drone start-up Nileworks Inc and recently tested in collaboration with JA Miyagi Tome and trading house Sumitomo Corp.

Their aim is to ease the physical burden and improve productivity in rural areas battling decades of falling birth rates and migration to urban areas.
"In Tome, farmers are an average 67-68 years old and they may only have another four to five years of farming left,'' Sakakibara said. "It's a matter of whether the body breaks down first, or the tractor."

Compared to larger radio-controlled mini-helicopters that cost around 15 million yen ($135,758) with spray equipment, the drone is smaller and cheaper, with a pricetag of about four million yen.

Nileworks is negotiating with authorities to allow operators to fly its drone without a license. It can be controlled with an iPad and runs on mapping software that is simple to operate.

"Our ultimate goal is to lower rice farming costs to one-fourth of what it is now," Nileworks president Hiroshi Yanagishita told reporters.

The drone can quickly analyse a rice stalk and determine how much pesticide or fertiliser it needs, making it easier for farmers to judge their input needs and estimate the crop size.
Nileworks plans to start selling the drone next year, with an annual target of 100 units in year one and 4,000 in five years.

Other drone makers such as SkymatiX Inc, jointly owned by trading house Mitsubishi Corp and electronics maker Hitachi Ltd, are offering drone services on farms.

Shota Chiba, a 29-year-old farmer in Tome, said technology could modernise farming and lure young people back to the land.
"People still have a strong stereotypical image of farming as a dirty and hard-labour job, but it's no longer all true thanks to gradual mechanization," he said.
"New technology like diagnostic drones could help change this old image and attract more young people to farming, which I truly enjoy," Chiba added.
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Re: Drones/Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV)

Post by Nereus » Fri Sep 14, 2018 11:27 am

Some of this is Australian specific, so if you are going to get one be aware of the Thailand laws.
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What drone is right for you?

https://www.flightsafetyaustralia.com/2 ... t-for-you/

The past few years has seen dozens of new drones enter the marketplace. This influx has created an endless choice for consumers and makes it difficult to choose which drone to buy and enjoy. With so many drones made for specific purposes, you firstly need to know what type of drone activity you want to do. The two most popular activities are FPV racing or ‘First Person View’ racing and aerial photography.

Long article with photos...………………………………………….>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
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