Drones/Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV)

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Re: Drones/Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV)

Post by HHTel » Mon Sep 25, 2017 10:43 pm

Approval/registration comes as a document/licence issued by the Transport Ministry along with rules that the user must adhere to. This is required if over 2kgs and/or has a camera.

You must be 18. You must have insurance. etc etc.

Procedure for authorisation:
Registration of copter (form download) and controller (form download) at the CAAT. To do this, you have to attach a copy of your identity card and the proof of a multicopter insurance.
Prove that you have not committed any offenses in Thailand. To do so, you need a confirmation of the National Intelligence Agency, the Office of the Narcotics Control Board and the Immigration Bureau.
If you submit the confirmations of Thai authorities, you receive the registration of your copter.
So it's not that simple. But 'enforcement'...... TIT

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Re: Drones/Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV)

Post by StevePIraq » Wed Sep 27, 2017 3:24 pm

Next thing the BIB are going to be putting up sky blocks so you have to pull over and show your license. Hello Hello Hello what's going on here then :neener: :neener:
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Re: Drones/Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV)

Post by Nereus » Wed Sep 27, 2017 3:43 pm

Super drone?

http://www.flightsafetyaustralia.com/20 ... takes-off/

Marty McFly and Emmett Brown, eat your heart out. The world’s first autonomous flying taxi has made its maiden flight in Dubai.

The electric two-seat craft, made by German firm Volocopter, will be used for the world’s first pilotless taxi service to be introduced by the Dubai roads and traffic authority in about five years as part of Dubai’s bid to be the world’s smartest city. It hopes that the aircraft will handle 25 per cent of passenger journeys in the city by 2030.

Volocopter’s investors include German automotive giant Daimler, which has put 25 million euros (about $A37.4 million) into the company.

The test flight was witnessed by the Crown Prince of Dubai, Sheikh Hamdan bin Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum.
According to a Dubai RTA media release, the prototype air taxi is environmentally friendly and quiet. It has a maximum flight time of about 30 minutes at a cruise speed of 50 km/h, (27 kt) with a maximum airspeed of 100 km/h (54 kt). The vehicle is about two metres tall and the diameter of the rotor rim, including the 18 propellers, is seven metres.

Over the next five years, the RTA will collaborate with United Arab Emirates and Dubai Civil Aviation Authority to develop operational policies and procedures, including aircraft certification, safety and security standards, routes and landing points.

Dubai RTA Director-General, Mattar Al Tayer, said ‘the autonomous air taxi has a variety of unique features that include top security and safety standards, and multiple redundancies in all critical components, such as propellers, motors, power source, electronics and flight controls.’

‘It is also fitted with optional emergency parachutes, nine independent battery systems and a battery quick-charge and plug-in system, which takes two hours to reach full charge in the prototype version, a time that will be significantly reduced in the production version.’
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Re: Drones/Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV)

Post by Nereus » Thu Oct 12, 2017 9:02 am

Drone users face fines, jail terms

https://www.bangkokpost.com/news/genera ... jail-terms

Owners of all drones must register their devices within 90 days or face up to five years in prison and a 100,000-baht fine.
The registration period began on Wednesday. During the process, all non-registered drones must be grounded, according to the National Broadcasting and Telecommunications Commission's (NBTC) order issued on Wednesday.

The NBTC stepped in to regulate drones as they are controlled by communication radio frequencies, a matter which comes under the jurisdiction of the agency. Previously, drone users were regulated by Transport Ministry.

Drone owners can register their devices at the Civil Aviation Authority of Thailand (CAAT) and the NBTC headquarters and its 21 provincial offices as well as police stations nationwide.
According to the order that became effective after an NBTC board meeting on Wednesday, the move is aimed at protecting the kingdom.

NBTC secretary-general Takorn Tantasith said there are about 50,000 drones in the country. They are increasingly popular for a variety of services and activities.

However, only 350 of them were registered under a regulation issued by Transport Ministry since 2015.
"Only 350 drones out of the total of 50,000 -- that's of great concern to the regulator," he said.

He said the NBTC needs to better optimise regulatory systems for drones.
The NBTC needs to register items of radio communication. Registration would include pictures of drones and copies of identification cards of registrants.

People who own drones will have to provide their names, details of serial numbers of communication devices, and pictures.

Mr Takorn said flying and controlling drones needs to comply with the existing regulation governing related conditions by the CAAT. "People must be aware they cannot use drones which are unregistered because it will violate the Communications Radio Act. Punishment includes imprisonment not exceeding five years or a fine not exceeding 100,000 baht or both," he said.

Mr Takorn said when the registration period ends in January 2018, those who want to import drones must seek permission from NBTC first.

The NBTC's call for users and distributors across the country to register their drones has been met with a mixed reaction on social media.

Several Facebook and Twitter users voiced opposition to the move, saying there was no necessity to register and the process was far too complicated.

"I bought a drone at Klong Thom for 920 baht, so I could fly it within a height of 100 metres for my kid to see," said Facebook user Virat Srianan. "It will probably break in three months' time, so is registration really required for that?"
Twitter user Puean Reak Ta Whan had similar views.

"Registration should be available at the stores selling the drones themselves. Most people will not go to the NTBC's headquarters to register because it is tedious and a waste of time," wrote Twitter user Puean Reak Ta Whan.

Other online reactions from Facebook supported the drone registrations. "It's a matter of national security," said Chai Dechmanee. "Drones with cameras can easily be used to spy on others."

"If you want to use them freely, then use them responsibly. Some use them irresponsibly, and it ruins the fun for the rest," said another Facebook user, Bas Bas Classic.
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Re: Drones/Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV)

Post by buksida » Thu Oct 12, 2017 9:28 am

All drones must be registered within 90 days or their owners face punishment
Owners of drones are required to register the pilotless flying machines within 90 days as of October 11 otherwise their owners may face a 5-year jailterm and/or a fine of 100,000 baht, said Mr Takorn Tanthasit, secretary-general of the National Broadcasting and Telecommunications Commission (NBTC), on Wednesday.

The NBTC, on the same day, slapped a ban on the use of telecommunication devices on unregistered drones.

The NBTC board held a special meeting on Wednesday to discuss the issue of drones which have been widely used but with little control. It was reported that only 350 drones were registered with the Civil Aviation Authority of Thailand.

Takorn said owners of drones can register with the NBTC Office or its branch offices throughout the country, the Civil Aviation Authority of Thailand and police stations as of October 11 for the next 90 days, failing that they will face punishments.

Drone owners can must bring with them their ID cards, pictures of their drones and filling forms of the NBTC for registration.

http://englishnews.thaipbs.or.th/drones ... nishments/
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Re: Drones/Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV)

Post by J.J.B. » Thu Oct 12, 2017 1:17 pm

Registration is required in the US and I can see it coming to the UK fairly soon too. I think it needs to be an all or nothing approach otherwise it becomes an even greater bureaucratic nightmare. Too bad for people with the 900 Baht drones but nobody is forced to buy them.

There is a huge amount of misinformation and paranoia around drones being used to ‘spy’ on people. In brief, the cameras are not great - despite 4K marketing claims - and no consumer drones have zoom lenses as all are designed for wide, panoramic shots. In the UK, I can stand on public ground, such as the road and take photos of your house and not be breaking any laws. It might be a different matter if I had a 600mm telephoto lens and was looking to get shots of you in your bedroom but drones are really not devices for spying.

Additionally, you don’t own the airspace over your house. Provided drones fly at or above the legal minimum safe height above the ground (50m in the UK) over people or property not under the operator’s control, and are not in controlled airspace, there’s not much to be done. If you do take action against a drone, whether you think it’s being flown legally or not, you can be prosecuted for action against an aircraft. This is a serious, criminal offence as the law doesn’t currently distinguish between a drone and a 747.

Of course, Thailand’s law and its interpretation will be different.
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Re: Drones/Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV)

Post by STEVE G » Thu Oct 12, 2017 6:26 pm

Just out of curiosity, why is a drone safer if it's more than 50m over your head?

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Re: Drones/Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV)

Post by J.J.B. » Fri Oct 13, 2017 4:10 pm

I don’t think it is, necessarily, it’s just the minimum height limit set by the CAA, similar to manned aircraft having to be above 500 feet except for take-off, landing, emergencies or sanctioned manoeuvres. My guess would be that it is enough height to allow an operator to steer the craft away from people or objects it might damage. With a light aircraft with a typical glide ratio of 10:1, you could theoretically travel one mile horizontally from 500 feet. With a drone, if it lost all power (something I have not ever known to have happened) it would just fall from the sky. Perhaps higher is not so ‘safe’ after all!

I think the authorities are still getting to grips with this very new and rapidly developing technology and are retrofitting regulations from established manned flight. There are no airframe certifications for drones and probably never will be so a lot of this is going to be trial and error. Hopefully less error.
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Re: Drones/Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV)

Post by laphanphon » Fri Oct 13, 2017 7:14 pm

Original rules were if over 2 kg, had to be registered. Which most are not, unless professional for photography, and in many cases, something professional would be a hexacopter, not the hobby grade quadcopters.

Difference being the redundancy of 6 motor / props vs 4, and able to have a semi -
controlled landing with loss of one motor. Where a quad will simply drop out of the sky if one motor fails, for whatever reason.

I've had a quad drop out of sky, and hit the headlight of my car and didn't even crack it. Unless extremely high, it's not going to hit terminal velocity and unless extremely unlucky, getting hit at all, I doubt very much if injuries would be any more than minor, and a few stitches at best or wost :) . Any operator can cut the motors at any time, if losing control for any reason.

Why the rules are, can't fly over crowds, so eliminates that even happening. Follow the rules, no flying over crowds, 30 meters from people and buildings, and no incidents should cause injury.

Registering all UAVs is overkill, and I called the CAAT locally, to register, and they didn't have a clue about registering, and didn't want to be bothered. TIT
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Re: Drones/Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV)

Post by laphanphon » Sat Oct 14, 2017 1:38 pm

This is you standard size hobby grade quadcopter. Actually the one in vid is the CX-20, motor to motor dia is 360 mm. The XK X380 is almost 380 mm across. DJI Phantoms 2 / 3s, are 350 mm and usually the standard. And start at $500 USD.

Much more expensive in Thailand, as prices above are USA pricing, or online, subject to added custom duty.

They are the least expensive, entry level for photography, that the amateur would probably have, who would be more prone to have an oops. Anything smaller, usually 250 mm and smaller, will be extremely lite.

Anything else is rather expensive. DJI Phantoms 4, ($1000 USD) full package only weighs 1380 gr and also about average size 350 mm, for all hobby grade quads The Xiaomi Mi is 410 mm, I think.

My DIY builds are 450, 500, 550, I think, and still the largest, only weighs 1.8 kg. All well under the original wt restriction for registering (2+ kg). The latest, to register all, is just knee jerk reaction and a bit silly really.

I have some that fit in the palm of my hand, even smaller.........do I really need to register them.

Image

If following the rules, even having an oops as in the vid, major malfunction, nobody should be injured.

Not over crowds
30 meters from people
30 meters from buildings
8 or 9 kms from airport

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Re: Drones/Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV)

Post by laphanphon » Mon Oct 16, 2017 11:33 pm

Now, on to more important things, and actually some better, accurate and up to date info, for those tourist and people living here, who wish to fly.

Basically the same rules apply, but MUST REGISTER WITH NBTC, before flying, and actually a painless chore.

CAAT flyer, is inaccurate, stating those with 'all' cameras must register with them and was released a few days ago, apparently without proof reading, or they changed their mind.

Most hobby grade, under 2 kg with camera are good to go, AFTER REGISTRATION.

Link for all info needed to register, and I may even do myself......ENJOY

http://www.richardbarrow.com/2017/10/ho ... -thailand/
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Re: Drones/Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV)

Post by laphanphon » Thu Oct 19, 2017 8:15 pm

UPDATE: info revised or corrected. Now have to register with CAAT also, along with insurance if having a camera.

http://www.richardbarrow.com/2017/10/ho ... -thailand/
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Re: Drones/Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV)

Post by Bluesky » Tue Oct 24, 2017 9:54 am

Where Eagles Dare: French military using winged warriors to hunt down rogue drones


The French military is literally going where eagles dare in an effort to combat the increasing use of drones by criminals and terrorists.

Following incidents of drones flying over the presidential palace and restricted military sites – along with the deadly 2015 Paris terror attacks – the French air force has trained four golden eagles to intercept and destroy the rogue aircraft.

Aptly named d'Artagnan, Athos, Porthos and Aramis – an homage to Alexandre Dumas’ “The Three Musketeers” – the four birds of prey have been honing their attack skills at the Mont-de-Marsan in southwestern France since mid-2016

It takes about eight months to fully train the birds, but the eagles are surrounded by drones from before they hatch to make the unmanned flying devices part of their natural environment and to teach the birds to associate drones with being fed.
A drone means food for these birds,” Gerald Machoukow, the military base's falconer, told FRANCE 24. “Now they automatically go after them.”
The use of hunting birds – normally falcons and northern goshawks – by militaries around the globe is common practice in the fight to scare other other critters away from runways and so cut the risk of accidents during takeoff or landing. But it wasn’t until 2015 when the Dutch started using bald eagles to intercept drones that other militaries started to see the benefit of these winged warriors.The French bred the four golden eagles – three males and one female -- using artificial insemination since eagles are a protected species and harvesting wild eggs is strictly forbidden. They chose the golden eagle because of the birds hooked beak and sharp eyesight.

Also weighing in around 11 pounds, the birds are in a similar weight class as the drones they’re sent to destroy and clocking in at a top air speed of 50 miles per hour, with the capability of spotting its target from over a mile away, the eagles are deft hunters.

To protect the eagles from drone blades and any explosive device that might be attached the them, the French military designed mittens of leather and Kevlar, an anti-blast material, to protect the bird’s talons."I love these birds," Machoukow told Agence France-Presse. "I don't want to send them to their death."

The birds are first taught to attack in a straight line before graduating to diving from heights. Soon they’ll be patrolling the skies over the Pyrenees Mountains in southern France and could possibly be deployed at airports and special events, such as political summits and soccer tournaments.

While an initial progress report on the eagles’ capabilities is due in June, French officials say that the results are promising and the French air force already expects four more eagles to join the fleet at Mont-de-Marsan by the summer.
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http://www.foxnews.com/world/2017/02/22 ... rones.html
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Re: Drones/Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV)

Post by Nereus » Fri Jan 05, 2018 1:16 pm

Unlicensed drones targeted

https://www.bangkokpost.com/business/te ... d#cxrecs_s

Drone owners have four days to register their devices or face up to five years in prison or a 100,000-baht fine.
The National Broadcasting and Telecommunications Commission (NBTC) issued an order in October that all owners of unmanned aerial vehicles must register their devices within 90 days, with a deadline of Jan 9.

The three channels through which drone owners can register are the Civil Aviation Authority of Thailand (CAAT), the NBTC headquarters and its 21 provincial offices, and police stations nationwide.

NBTC secretary-general Takorn Tantasith said 7,064 drones were registered as of Jan 3, with 2,970 registered at the NBTC headquarters in Bangkok, 3,388 at NBTC provincial offices and 706 via the CAAT.

The NBTC has yet to receive figures on the number of drones registered at police stations.

Users of non-registered drones will violate the Communication Radio Act. Punishment includes imprisonment not exceeding five years or a fine not exceeding 100,000 baht or both.

"We reiterate that the rule is to safeguard the peace of people and protect the Kingdom," Mr Takorn said.
According to NBTC data, Thailand has about 50,000 imported drones. The devices are increasingly popular for various services and activities.

Under a previous Transport Ministry rule, 350 drones were registered since 2015.
Mr Takorn said the NBTC needs to optimise the regulatory system for drone shops and individuals who own the devices.

Shops that import drones must register with an official form, a picture of the device and a copy of the ID card of the registrant.

Drone owners have to fill in their name, surname and the drone's serial number, and include a picture of the registered drone and a copy of their ID card.
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Re: Drones/Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV)

Post by PeteC » Fri Jan 05, 2018 7:45 pm

Do you have to register remote control model airplanes, helicopters and boats as well?

Good luck with only 7,000 out of 50,000 registered with 4 days to go.

I imagine this story will go into hibernation for many months, shortly. Pete :cheers:

PS: Glue a little Lego man into your drone, then it's "manned"

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