The scourge of Facebook

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Big Boy
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Re: The scourge of Facebook

Post by Big Boy » Wed Sep 12, 2018 8:55 am

HaHa - I wouldn't dream of doing anything for profit from Thailand. I'm just amazed that Facebook took it and turned it into an advert for no financial gain, and without asking first. I have managed to get rid of the advert now.
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Re: The scourge of Facebook

Post by centermid7 » Wed Sep 12, 2018 4:37 pm

Not quite!

I'll take one of the 4x please. They are hard enough to find and at 340 Bt I would not care if it had your picture on it. LOL

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Re: The scourge of Facebook

Post by buksida » Sat Sep 29, 2018 9:59 am

Facebook faces class-action lawsuit over massive new hack
Facebook is already facing immense fallout from revelations this morning that a hacker exploited a security flaw in a popular feature of the social network to steal account credentials of as many as 50 million users.

https://www.theverge.com/2018/9/28/1791 ... s-affected


Facebook blocked users from posting some stories about its security breach
Some users are reporting that they are unable to post today’s big story about a security breach affecting 50 million Facebook users. The issue appears to only affect particular stories from certain outlets, at this time one story from The Guardian and one from the Associated Press, both reputable press outlets.

When going to share the story to their news feed, some users, including members of the staff here at TechCrunch who were able to replicate the bug, were met with the following error message which prevented them from sharing the story.

https://techcrunch.com/2018/09/28/faceb ... ian-story/


IMO it really is time that this scourge was taken off the internet.
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Re: The scourge of Facebook

Post by handdrummer » Sat Sep 29, 2018 12:59 pm

The only way Facebook will change is if millions of users stop using it. Consumers have all the power but sit around wringing their hands and waiting for "someone" to do "something."

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Re: The scourge of Facebook

Post by buksida » Sat Sep 29, 2018 1:05 pm

Stopped using it months ago when they demanded proof of ID.
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Re: The scourge of Facebook

Post by PeteC » Sat Sep 29, 2018 1:10 pm

php9zUfGZPM.jpg
php9zUfGZPM.jpg (37.9 KiB) Viewed 317 times

Which Asian Country Has the Most Facebook Users?


Full story: http://www.nationmultimedia.com/detail/ ... T/30355459
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Re: The scourge of Facebook

Post by buksida » Sat Sep 29, 2018 1:11 pm

FACEBOOK SAYS 50M USER ACCOUNTS AFFECTED BY SECURITY BREACH
Facebook reported a major security breach in which 50 million user accounts were accessed by unknown attackers.

The attackers gained the ability to “seize control” of those accounts, Facebook said, by stealing digital keys the company uses to keep people logged in. Facebook has logged out owners of the 50 million affected accounts — plus another 40 million who were vulnerable to the attack. Users don’t need to change their Facebook passwords, it said.

Facebook said it doesn’t know who was behind the attacks or where they’re based. In a call with reporters on Friday, CEO Mark Zuckerberg said that attackers would have had the ability to view private messages or post on someone’s account, but there’s no sign that they did.

“We do not yet know if any of the accounts were actually misused,” Zuckerberg said.

Facebook shares fell $4.38, or 2.6 percent, to close at $164.46 on Friday.

http://www.khaosodenglish.com/news/inte ... ty-breach/
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Re: The scourge of Facebook

Post by PeteC » Sat Sep 29, 2018 2:37 pm

ASSOCIATED PRESS

NEW YORK: For users, Facebook's revelation of a data breach that gave attackers access to 50 million accounts raises an important question: What happens next?

For the owners of the affected accounts, and of another 40 million that Facebook considered at risk, the first order of business may be a simple one: sign back into the app. Facebook logged everyone out of all 90 million accounts in order to reset digital keys the hackers had stolen -- keys normally used to keep users logged in, but which could also give outsiders full control of the compromised accounts.

Next up is the waiting game, as Facebook continues its investigation and users scan for notifications that their accounts were targeted by the hackers.

What Facebook knows so far is that hackers got access to the 50 million accounts by exploiting three distinct bugs in Facebook's code that allowed them to steal those digital keys, technically known as "access tokens". The company says it has fixed the bugs.

Users don't need to change their Facebook passwords, it said, although security experts say it couldn't hurt to do so.

Facebook, however, doesn't know who was behind the attacks or where they're based. In a call with reporters on Friday, CEO Mark Zuckerberg -- whose own account was compromised -- said that attackers would have had the ability to view private messages or post on someone's account, but there's no sign that they did.

"We do not yet know if any of the accounts were actually misused,'' Mr Zuckerberg said.

The hack is the latest setback for Facebook during a tumultuous year of security problems and privacy issues. So far, though, none of these issues has significantly shaken the confidence of the company's 2 billion global users.

This latest hack involved bugs in Facebook's "View As'' feature, which lets people see how their profiles appear to others. The attackers used that vulnerability to steal access tokens from the accounts of people whose profiles came up in searches using the "View As'' feature. The attack then moved along from one user's Facebook friend to another. Possession of those tokens would allow attackers to control those accounts.

One of the bugs was more than a year old and affected how the "View As'' feature interacted with Facebook's video uploading feature for posting "happy birthday'' messages, said Guy Rosen, Facebook's vice-president of product management. But it wasn't until mid-September that Facebook noticed an uptick in unusual activity, and not until this week that it learned of the attack, Mr Rosen said.

"We haven't yet been able to determine if there was specific targeting'' of particular accounts, Mr Rosen said in a call with reporters. "It does seem broad. And we don't yet know who was behind these attacks and where they might be based.''

Neither passwords nor credit card data was stolen, Rosen said. He said the company has alerted the FBI and regulators in the United States and Europe.

Jake Williams, a security expert at Rendition Infosec, said he is concerned that the hack could have affected third-party applications.

Mr Williams noted that the company's "Facebook Login'' feature lets users log into other apps and websites with their Facebook credentials. "These access tokens that were stolen show when a user is logged into Facebook and that may be enough to access a user's account on a third party site,'' he said.

Facebook confirmed late Friday that third-party apps, including its own Instagram app, could have been affected.

"The vulnerability was on Facebook, but these access tokens enabled someone to use the account as if they were the account-holder themselves,'' Mr Rosen said.

News broke early this year that a data analytics firm once employed by the Trump campaign, Cambridge Analytica, had improperly gained access to personal data from millions of user profiles. Then a congressional investigation found that agents from Russia and other countries have been posting fake political ads since at least 2016. In April, Mr Zuckerberg appeared at a congressional hearing focused on Facebook's privacy practices.

The Facebook bug is reminiscent of a much larger attack on Yahoo in which attackers compromised 3 billion accounts -- enough for half of the world's entire population. In the case of Yahoo, information stolen included names, email addresses, phone numbers, birthdates and security questions and answers. It was among a series of Yahoo hacks over several years.

US prosecutors later blamed Russian agents for using the information they stole from Yahoo to spy on Russian journalists, US and Russian government officials and employees of financial services and other private businesses.

In Facebook's case, it may be too early to know how sophisticated the attackers were and if they were connected to a nation state, said Thomas Rid, a professor at the Johns Hopkins University. Mr Rid said it could also be spammers or criminals.

"Nothing we've seen here is so sophisticated that it requires a state actor,'' Mr Rid said. "Fifty million random Facebook accounts are not interesting for any intelligence agency.''
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Re: The scourge of Facebook

Post by buksida » Sun Oct 14, 2018 7:38 am

Facebook says hackers accessed data of 29 million users
Facebook said Friday that hackers accessed personal data of 29 million users in a breach at the world's leading social network disclosed late last month.

The company had originally said up to 50 million accounts were affected in a cyberattack that exploited a trio of software flaws to steal "access tokens" that enable people to automatically log back onto the platform.

"We now know that fewer people were impacted than we originally thought," Facebook vice president of product management Guy Rosen said in a conference call updating the investigation.The hackers -- whose identities are still a mystery -- accessed the names, phone numbers and email addresses of 15 million users, he said.

For another 14 million people, the attack was potentially more damaging.Facebook said cyberattackers accessed that data plus additional information including gender, religion, hometown, birth date and places they had recently "checked in" to as visiting.

http://www.nationmultimedia.com/detail/ ... T/30356396
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Re: The scourge of Facebook

Post by handdrummer » Mon Oct 15, 2018 9:27 am

Only 29 million. I feel much better now.

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