Where do all the old aircraft end up

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Nereus
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Where do all the old aircraft end up

Post by Nereus »

Even allowing for the pandemic, it is incredible how many aircraft are scrapped, and just where it happens.
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5 Of The Biggest Airplane Graveyards In The World

https://simpleflying.com/largest-airpla ... 20aircraft.

An aircraft graveyard or boneyard is where planes go to be stored or scrapped.

A comprehensive look at five of the world's biggest aircraft graveyards and why their location was deemed ideally suited for the job. Before we get into that, though, what exactly is an aircraft graveyard? Almost always located in deserts or places with little humidity, aircraft graveyards or boneyards, as they are also known, are where planes go for long-term storage or to be scrapped.

The most significant proportion of aircraft graveyards can be found in the Southwestern United States. Still, there are other parts of the world, like the Middle East and Australia, that have similar weather. Storing aircraft in places that have little humidity helps to prevent corrosion, and the hard, solid ground does not need to be paved, saving thousands of dollars. Before aircraft are scrapped for their metal, engines, instruments, and anything that can be reused is removed, leaving just a metal shell.

Davis-Monthan United States Air Force Base (I flew past this in a helicopter many years ago-- took about 10 minutes!)
Size: 10,633 acres (16.5 square miles)
Photo: Stuart Rankin|Flickr
Photo: Stuart Rankin|Flickr
davis-monthon sml.jpg (101.94 KiB) Viewed 1377 times
Surprisingly several in Europe:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aircraft_boneyard

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

An aircraft boneyard or aircraft graveyard is a storage area for aircraft which are retired from service. Most aircraft at boneyards are either kept for storage continuing to receive some maintenance or parts of the aircraft are removed for reuse or resale and the aircraft are scrapped. Boneyard facilities are generally located in deserts such as those in the southwestern United States, since the dry conditions reduce corrosion and the hard ground does not need to be paved.[1][2] In some cases, aircraft which were planned to be scrapped or were stored indefinitely without plans of ever returning to service were brought back into service, as the aviation market or the demands of military aviation changed or failed to develop as was anticipated.[3][4][5]

Some yards are privately owned and operated, others belong to the military including the 309th Aerospace Maintenance and Regeneration Group at Davis-Monthan Air Force Base in Tucson, Arizona.
May you be in heaven half an hour before the devil know`s you`re dead!
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